New or used boat lets talk about it ?

Dealers can list items for sale in this area.
honda cat
I really need a life!
I really need a life!
Posts: 415
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 6:49 am
Name: frank martin

New or used boat lets talk about it ?

Unread post by honda cat »

So, you are thinking about upgrading your ride on the water? It can be challenging since there are so many options in the boat marketplace today. But isn’t that part of the fun? One of the most important decisions is to buy new - or used. There is no right or wrong answer – it really depends on what you are looking for in your boating experience. Because we all know that boating is a journey that doesn’t stop at the point of sale.
Here are a few reasons from both sides:
Reasons to Buy New
You don’t have to worry about how the previous owner treated the boat. As you know some people baby their toys, and other ride them hard and put them away wet! Your new boat is coming off the showroom floor directly to you without any scary history.
You will be getting the latest and greatest technology. There have been so many advancements in the boating industry lately – and new boats today have all the bells and whistles.
If something goes wrong, you have a manufacturer and dealer to help you through the issue and get you back on the water.
The dealer can usually arrange for an in-water demo. You learn a lot about a how a boat handles and performs with a sea trial.
Reasons to Buy Used
The ‘D’ word! Depreciation happens quickly with a new boat. Some say that a boat depreciates 25 to 30 percent as soon as it is towed off the dealer’s lot. You get more bang for your buck when you find a boat on the used market.
A used boat comes with added options. Many time the dealer price on new boats do not include the extras like electronics and fishing gear. Finding a used boat with the options you like is a bonus!
Even new boats have kinks to work out. By asking questions you can find out from the owner about each boat’s unique personality.
The internet. There are many forums and web pages dedicated to the boating community. By researching used boats online, you can tap into a wealth of information from folks who have experience with the boat you are considering.
Whatever boat you choose for your next adventure, don’t be afraid. Your next boat is out there, sitting in someone’s back lot - or in a dealer’s showroom – just waiting for you to find her!

Calumet Marine
426 Burnham Ave
Calumet City, IL 60409
708-862-2407
www.calumetmarine.com

special thanks to my buddy the wizard of words for helping me get my thoughts to print !

Read more: http://calumetmarine.proboards.com/thre ... z5CnDsAyiR

honda cat
I really need a life!
I really need a life!
Posts: 415
Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 6:49 am
Name: frank martin

Re: New or used boat lets talk about it ?

Unread post by honda cat »

Don’t Forget an Up-Close Trailer Inspection When Buying a Used Boat
So, you found your dream boat and can’t wait to tow it home. Make sure that you give the trailer a good close-up inspection. A good trailer will make your boating experience much more enjoyable – a bad one will be nothing but headaches. A trailer that is not roadworthy could cost you hundreds of dollars in repairs. If possible it's best to inspect a trailer when the boat is not sitting on it. The bunks and frame will be much easier to see. Start by walking around the trailer and looking at these points:
Frame and Fenders - Inspect the trailer frame for rust and peeling paint. You may have to sandblast and repaint problem areas. Fenders shouldn't be loose or rusted. Fenders are often used as a step, make sure they're still strong enough to support your weight.
Weight -The trailer specification label may be missing. To know a spring-axle trailer’s weight capacity, measure the diameter of the axle. An outer diameter (OD) axle tube size of 1.75” is typically rated for about one ton; 2.375” for 3,500 lbs.; and 3” for 5,200-7,000 lbs. – remember to subtract the weight of the trailer from the gross capacity.

Tires - Tire diameter matters – larger is better. After an hour at highway speeds, a 13-inch tire will have spun 10,000 revolutions more than a 15-inch tire, which means more heat, bearing wear and increased chance of problems. Having a good spare tire mounted on the trailer – and the tools to install it – will get you out of a jam on the side of the road.

Trailer Wiring - The connection between the trailer and your tow vehicle should be made through a quick-disconnect plug or connector. All wiring should be properly insulated and secured. Look for wire supports at every 18”. Wiring at bends, flex points, and near moving parts should be inspected for wear.

Lights & Reflectors - At a minimum, each trailer must have working brake lights and turn signals. Most boat trailers should display red side-marker lamps at the rear and amber side-marker lamps or reflectors toward the front. For trailers wider than 80 inches, three red identification lamps are required on the rear crossmember. Extra brake lights mounted up high can increase safety.

Suspension -Check that the suspension is creating at least four inches of clearance at the lowest point of your trailer. Leaf springs will wear out before the frame and may require replacement.

Tires and Bearings - Dry rot ruins most trailer tires before the treads wear out. A dry-rotted tire or one with bulges needs to be replaced. Wheel bearings shouldn't wobble or have excessive play. The good news is that replacing wheel bearings is usually a simple fix.

Brakes: - Brakes are required on most trailers rated to carry more than 3,000 pounds. If the trailer is rated to carry 3,000 pounds or more, your state will specify the type and location of brakes required. You may also be required to have an emergency breakaway cable that activates should the trailer separate from the tow vehicle.

Trailer Coupler - The coupler should have markings on the tongue telling you the ball size and its capacity. Be sure that you have an adequately rated receiver and hitch and a properly sized ball on your tow vehicle for towing the total package. If you see anything that looks unfamiliar make sure it fits with your tow vehicle.

Safety Chains - Check the safety chains to make sure that they're the right length to keep the trailer coupler from dragging on the road. A pin or a padlock that secures through the coupler latch is a good idea.
If you have been boating for a few years, I’m sure you have some stories about how your trailer let you down on the side of the road. By going through this check list, you can save yourself some grief – and make boating more enjoyable.
Calumet Marine
426 Burnham Ave.
Calumet City, IL 60409
www.calumetmarine.com

Post Reply